LOW, MEDIUM or HIGH GI, which are more risky for health.

 LOW, MEDIUM or HIGH GI, which are more risky for health.

Glycemic Index || Neo Science Hub

Low GI – The Glycemic Index (GI) is a measurement system that ranks foods according to their effect on our blood sugar levels. It has been more preferred nowadays as health care is on the rise. It is always a choice for weight watchers and those with diabetes since the food is slowly digested and absorbed, causing a slower rise in blood-sugar levels. Several factors influence the glycemic index of a food, including its nutrient composition, cooking method, ripeness, and the amount of processing it has undergone. This measurement increases awareness of what one can serve on their plate, which indirectly tells us how much cholesterol we are taking in everyday. 

Foods are classified as low, medium, or high glycemic foods and are ranked on a scale of 0–100. The lower the GI of a specific food, the less it may affect your blood sugar levels. The three GI ratings are Low: 55 or Less; Medium: 56–69. High: 70 or above.

Foods high in refined carbs and sugar are digested more quickly and often have a high GI; whole foods high in protein, fat, or fiber typically have a low GI. Foods that contain no carbs are not assigned a GI and include meat, fish, poultry, nuts, seeds, herbs, spices, and oils.

Other factors that affect the GI of a food include its ripeness, cooking method, type of sugar it contains, and the amount of processing it has undergone. 

Glycemic Index || Neo Science Hub
Glycemic Index || Neo Science Hub

Keep in mind that the glycemic index is different from the glycemic load (GL). Unlike the GI, which doesn’t take into account the amount of food eaten, the GL factors in the number of carbs in a serving of a food to determine how it may affect blood sugar levels, says health research websites. For this reason, it’s important to take both the glycemic index and glycemic load into consideration when selecting foods to help support healthy blood sugar levels. Mithilesh and Harsha, founders of Deccan Mundra, have researched on the subjects and tell us how low GI is more on the chart for food lovers. In a conversation they said: “We identified that there is a gap in the market in the low GI segment thereby wanting to establish Low GI as a category. There are benefits of switching to a Low GI diet such as can aid in sugar control, improve cholesterol levels, may reduce risk of cancer, help to maintain weight, may reduce the risk of heart disease.”

One of the research University studies on how to follow the GI chart, explains that a healthy, low glycemic diet should comprise mostly low GI foods, such as: Fruits: apples, berries, oranges, lemons, limes and grapefruit. Non-starchy vegetables: broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, spinach, tomatoes. Whole grains: quinoa, couscous, barley, buckwheat, farro, oats. Legumes: lentils, black beans, chickpeas, kidney beans. Foods without a GI value or with a very low GI can also be enjoyed as part of a balanced low glycemic diet. They include: Meat: beef, bison, lamb, pork, Seafood: tuna, salmon, shrimp, mackerel, anchovies, sardines. Poultry: chicken, turkey, duck, goose. Oils: olive oil, coconut oil, avocado oil, vegetable oil. Nuts: almonds, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pistachios.

Foods with a high GI include: Bread: white bread, bagels, naan, pita bread, Rice: white rice, jasmine rice, arborio rice. Cereals: instant oats, breakfast cereals. Pasta and noodles: lasagna, spaghetti, ravioli, macaroni, fettuccine. Starchy vegetables: mashed potatoes, potatoes, french fries. Ideally, try to replace these foods with foods that have a lower GI whenever possible. As per experts following a low glycemic diet involves swapping out foods that have a high GI with low GI alternatives. A low glycemic diet may help manage blood sugar levels, reduce your cholesterol, and boost short-term weight loss.

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